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MEG

Division Statement

Our goal is to make scientific and engineering contributions towards the utilization of HTS thin films and devices in bio-medicine over frequencies ranging from dc to microwave, and to enhance our understanding of high-frequency properties of HTS, dielectric, magnetic, and biological materials.

Our projects require interdisciplinary approaches, and include application research, device/technology development, and fundamental research. The latter includes electromagnetic methods of detecting and studying biological motors, such as the molecular turbine ATP synthase, which produces ATP, the “fuel” used by every part of the human body.

Areas of applied research in biomedicine include early detection of cancer using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), diagnostic techniques using SQUIDs for cardiology (fetal, neonatal, and adult), HTS radiofrequency (rf) coils for enhanced-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and novel sensors to detect metabolic syndrome in patients suffering from obesity, type-2 diabetes, and heart disease. We also study the surface manifestations of in vivo heat source for diagnostic bio/medical imaging.

MDA

Current Projects

Audrius Brazdeikis

  • Non-invasive Prenatal Diagnostics & Neuro-Assessment
  • Biomedical Imaging & Site Targeting Using Magnetic Nanomarkers
  • Magnetic Sensing Technologies For Staging & Treatment Of Cancer

Pei-Herng Hor

  • Thermal Metabolic Imaging

M. N. Iliev

  • Raman Imaging/Spectroscopy

T. Randall Lee

  • Gold-coated nanoparticles for ablation of tumor cells; drug delivery

John Miller

  • Applications of HTS Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices: Impedance Magnetocardiography, Chemomagnetism
  • Impedance Spectroscopy of Biological Systems
  • Dielectric Response of Whole Cells
  • Harmonic Generation Spectroscopy

Jarek Wosik

  • Superconducting (HTS) Arrays For MRI
  • Development of Cryogenic Arrays For Imaging of Small Animals.
  • Development of HTS Arrays For Imaging of Bone Structure: Microwave Spectroscopy Of Biological And Chemical Samples

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